FARMER”S MARKET WEEK August 5-11th 2012

FARMER”S MARKET WEEK August 5-11th 2012

"Organic Farmers after Fukushima"

posted by: Farm Organics Staff

The devastation of Fukushima is still being felt and no greater an impact than with the organic farmers of the region.

Organics Fellowship Cal Poly

Press Release

Cal Poly College of Agriculture

posted by: Farm Organics Staff

(pic courtesy of Cal Poly)

SAN LUIS OBISPO – The College of Agriculture, Food & Environmental Sciences Center for Sustainability will add a new faculty fellowship in organics to the Horticulture and Crop Science Department as a result of the Lundberg Family Farms’ pledge of support to the organic program at Cal Poly. 

With this fellowship, Cal Poly students will benefit from year-round training and research opportunities in organic farming methods, food safety, and sustainable agricultural systems.

The Center for Sustainability’s valued industry partners at Lundberg Family Farms, in combination with support from the Clarence C. Heller Charitable Foundation, have provided for the establishment of  the summer-quarter faculty fellowship dedicated to the field of organic and sustainable farming methods.

"The Center for Sustainability is delighted to have the opportunity to support education in this rapidly growing sector,” said Hunter Francis, the center’s director, “and we are so grateful for the generosity and vision of the Lundberg family in helping our college respond to growing student demand for it.”

This new fellowship will bring expertise in California production techniques in organic and sustainable agriculture systems, and will oversee Cal Poly’s 11-acre organic farm, where faculty, staff and students jointly manage the production, care, harvesting and marketing of organic produce.

“We are pleased to announce the selection of David Headrick as the recipient of the first summer fellowship in organics as a result of the support from Lundberg Family Farms,” said John Peterson, head of the Cal Poly Horticulture and Crop Science Department. “This position bolsters the strength of our coursework and programs in organic crop production and sustainable agriculture. This summer quarter, our students–who graduate to become industry leaders–will benefit from the knowledge and expertise that Dr. Headrick brings to Cal Poly’s Organic Farm.”

“Our family heritage and our brand identity are firmly rooted in the practice of organic and sustainable farming,” said Grant Lundberg, chief executive officer of Lundberg Family Farms. “Our partnership with Cal Poly is the perfect complement to our Raising Organic Family Farms initiative, which is our way of encouraging responsible land stewardship and sustainable agriculture among the next generation of farmers.” 

For more information on the Cal Poly Organic Farm, go to http://aeps.calpoly.edu/organics/.

"We Need to Be Aware"

posted by: Farm Organics Staff

Brief video from Morph City regarding the Technology Service Agreement/Waiver that Monsanto forces all of their farmers to sign. Upon signing the farmers are now responsible for all liability lawsuits that they may incur. If they try and sell their land to other farmers, then the new farmer and landowner have to abide by the waiver as well. Essentially turning over the land to Monsanto for perpetuity thus becoming servants of the corporation.

"Bringing in a New Year"
posted: by Farm Organics Staff
As we reflect back on 2011 we are left wondering what 2012 will bring. So much unfinished business and a general concern in our country as to what road are we headed down. But at the same time so much optimism abounds and that is the road that we here at Farm Organics wishes to explore. A world of endless hope and incredible solutions are awaiting those who seek them out. We hope you will join us as we grow organically as well.Finding the best possible solutions for those problems that are wishing to be solved, we hope you’ll join us.
Fully engaged in 2012 Happy New Year to all.
Organically yours;
Farm Organics
Photo: by D.E. Dotter

"Bringing in a New Year"

posted: by Farm Organics Staff

As we reflect back on 2011 we are left wondering what 2012 will bring. So much unfinished business and a general concern in our country as to what road are we headed down.

But at the same time so much optimism abounds and that is the road that we here at Farm Organics wishes to explore. A world of endless hope and incredible solutions are awaiting those who seek them out. We hope you will join us as we grow organically as well.

Finding the best possible solutions for those problems that are wishing to be solved, we hope you’ll join us.

Fully engaged in 2012 Happy New Year to all.

Organically yours;

Farm Organics

Photo: by D.E. Dotter

“What’s in a Movement”

posted: by Farm Organics Staff

Our team here at Farm Organics have been focused on many things over the past 6 weeks and are busying developing, implementing and growing our organization. But what as taken us by surprise. And by all accounts most of the Nation and the World, is the social uprising taking place on all levels of our society.

This spotlight on our democracy through these lenses was not anticipated. The level of expression has been monumental and the result is that the people of the United States need answers to many questions that plague the dysfunction of our systems.

Our most basic needs are either not being met or being denied at a time when the United States is the richest and most powerful country in the world, however its relationship with its citizenry is well…very strained at present.

Many blame large corporate interests for that strain. People are being asked to sacrifice while the corporations are not. 

So we at Farm Organics are trying our best to stay positive and objective and try as best as we might bring to you knowledge that will provide a platform for community and positive communication. Which hopefully leads to solutions and not divisions.

Jim Gerritsen of Wood Prairie Farm in Bridgewater, Maine is president of the Organic Seed Growers and Trade Association and recently took to the streets and the Occupy Movement. This video sums up his position and the current blight of small organic farmers and for that matter all farmers nationwide and their battle with GMO’s

"Two Incredible Events in One Month"

posted: by Farm Organics Staff

Today is agriculture’s equivalent to Earth Day and organized by The Center for Science in the Public interest. They have organized a number of events throughout the week http://www.foodday.org and have generated reminders and not-to-do’s, but the one that catches our eye here at Farm Organics is their support of an Asian and Mediterranean Diet. We also think that their 6 Food Day Princicples are one’s to consider and support.

6 FOOD DAY PRINCIPLES

1. Reduce diet-related disease by promoting safe, healthy foods

2. Support sustainable farms & limit subsidies to big agribusiness

3. Expand access to food and alleviate hunger

4. Protect the environment & animals by reforming factory farms

5. Promote health by curbing junk-food marketing to kids

6. Support fair conditions for food and farm workers

Additionally the month of October which is almost past is the month that has set into motion the beginning of the showdown of the 2012 Farm Bill and the insistence by a majority of Americans that our foods should have labels that inexplicably state where our food comes from and if it has been modified in any manner. Europe has in place this very practice. So why not here yet? and that’s a good question and that is what this month and this day is all about.

        GMOs are now present in 75 to 80 percent of conventional processed food in the U.S., according to the Grocery Manufacturers Association.

Organic Week “Canadian Style” 
posted: by Farm Organics Staff
Unbeknownst to me was this sudden discovery of a National Organics Week October 15th through the 22nd to be held up north on our Canadian neighbors farms, urban, suburban and cities alike.
The week which is organized by the Canadian Organic Growers and the Canadian Organic Trade Association will showcase the growing markets of organic produce, retail consumables, personal care and clothing items that have made a significant impact for Canadian retailers and Farmers in recent years.
Organic is truly a sustainable story that prepares the soils through permacultural and bio-intensive farming practices allowing for a more mineral and nutrient rich transfer from soil to plant. Organic does deplete the soil or the surrounding ecological footprint such as conventional farming does with pesticides, which produce more disease resistant plants and insects.

Organic Week “Canadian Style”

posted: by Farm Organics Staff

Unbeknownst to me was this sudden discovery of a National Organics Week October 15th through the 22nd to be held up north on our Canadian neighbors farms, urban, suburban and cities alike.

The week which is organized by the Canadian Organic Growers and the Canadian Organic Trade Association will showcase the growing markets of organic produce, retail consumables, personal care and clothing items that have made a significant impact for Canadian retailers and Farmers in recent years.

Organic is truly a sustainable story that prepares the soils through permacultural and bio-intensive farming practices allowing for a more mineral and nutrient rich transfer from soil to plant. Organic does deplete the soil or the surrounding ecological footprint such as conventional farming does with pesticides, which produce more disease resistant plants and insects.

Welcome to World Food Day
posted: by Farm Organics Staff
written by Andrew Shen Business Insider
 
Food prices are expected to increase around the world, and it’s hitting poor people the hardest, including Americans.
The U.N. 2011 report on global food insecurity paints a gloomy picture of both high and volatile food prices in the future.
According to the U.N., children who cannot afford proper nourishment in their first 1,000 days suffer a permanent reduction in their future earning capacity and increased chances of poverty.  This then leads to deleterious effects on entire economies.
High food prices affect nations in Sub-Saharan Africa the most, but they also have significant implications for the U.S. as well.  While the U.S. is not as seriously undernourished as the least-developed nations, a 2011 report by Feeding America revealed that approximately 1 out of every 5 children is “food insecure.”
The U.N. report, along with the OECD-FAO Agricultural Outlook 2011-2020, forecast an average of 20% increases in cereal, and 30% increases in meat.  Food prices are going up as natural resources become depleted, population increases, and demand for biofuels grows.
Photo: by D.E. Dotter

Welcome to World Food Day

posted: by Farm Organics Staff

written by Andrew Shen Business Insider

Food prices are expected to increase around the world, and it’s hitting poor people the hardest, including Americans.

The U.N. 2011 report on global food insecurity paints a gloomy picture of both high and volatile food prices in the future.

According to the U.N., children who cannot afford proper nourishment in their first 1,000 days suffer a permanent reduction in their future earning capacity and increased chances of poverty.  This then leads to deleterious effects on entire economies.

High food prices affect nations in Sub-Saharan Africa the most, but they also have significant implications for the U.S. as well.  While the U.S. is not as seriously undernourished as the least-developed nations, a 2011 report by Feeding America revealed that approximately 1 out of every 5 children is “food insecure.”

The U.N. report, along with the OECD-FAO Agricultural Outlook 2011-2020, forecast an average of 20% increases in cereal, and 30% increases in meat.  Food prices are going up as natural resources become depleted, population increases, and demand for biofuels grows.

Photo: by D.E. Dotter